Slow-Cooked Rib Eye with Potato Confit and Green Garlic–Parsley Butter

September 15, 2015

Ingredients

Green Garlic–Parsley Butter
  • 2 cups chopped green garlic (green and white parts)
  • 1 pound unsalted butter, slightly softened
  • 1 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 cup minced shallots
  • Grated zest of ½ lemon (use a Microplane)
  • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons anchovy paste
Rib Eye
  • 1 center-cut bone-in rib eye roast (about 7.5 pounds), deckle and fat cap left on
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Canola oil
  • 15 thyme sprigs
  • 15 rosemary sprigs
  • 1 garlic bulb, cut in half
  • 5 cups Heirloom Potato Confit (recipe follows)
Heirloom Potato Confit
  • 1 gallon water
  • 2 cups kosher salt
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 5 pounds small heirloom potatoes, washed
  • 1 pound unsalted butter
  • 2 cups extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups Rendered Fresh Lard (recipe follows)
  • 1 cup rendered bacon fat
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
  • 20 thyme sprigs
  • 12 garlic cloves
  • 2 fresh bay leaves
Rendered Fresh Lard
  • 1 quart pork fat, diced into ½-inch pieces
  • ½ cup water

About this recipe

I know, I know, meat and potatoes . . . so avant-garde. But sometimes one exceptional meal at home with loved ones can be just as special as a 20-course tasting menu at a grand restaurant.

Slow-cooking is a technique that lends itself well to a large cut like the rib eye. The secret is twofold: Get a good sear on the meat before placing it in the oven, and arrange it so that the delicious fat cap slowly bastes the meat as it cooks.

One year at potato-planting time, we placed an order with Celeste Albers to ensure that both restaurants stayed stocked throughout the season. When she finally delivered the potatoes, they came in at hundreds of pounds, so we used this technique to preserve them. Cooking them and storing them in the fat makes them even better! These potatoes can be used in a number of ways. My favorite method is a simple one: I cut them in half and roast them on the stovetop in their own cooking fat, rolling them around so they get nice and brown. You can finish them with a bunch of fresh herbs sprinkled into the pan just before serving.

Such a decadent cut of meat topped with a flavorful pat of butter deserves a sinful side dish, and this potato confit certainly fills the bill. It can be made well in advance and stored in the fridge. In fact, the longer it sits, the better it tastes; the potatoes just continue to soak up all that tasty and delicious fat.


Excerpted from Heritage by Sean Brock (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2014. Photographs by Peter Frank Edwards.

Instructions

For the green garlic–parsley butter:

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Make an ice bath in a bowl with equal parts ice and water. Put the green garlic in a strainer and submerge it in the boiling water for 7 seconds, then remove and submerge it in the ice bath until completely cold. Remove from the ice bath, shake off the excess water, then drain and dry on paper towels.

2. Put the green garlic in a blender and blend on high until smooth, about 5 minutes; add a splash of water as needed to keep the blade running smoothly.

3. Combine the garlic purée, butter, parsley, shallots, lemon zest, lemon juice, Worcestershire sauce, salt, pepper and anchovy paste in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix on low speed until thoroughly blended, about 2 minutes. Divide the butter in half and put each portion on a sheet of plastic wrap. Roll each one into a log and wrap tightly in the plastic. Place in the freezer and freeze until solid.

For the rib eye:

Serves 6

4. Preheat oven to 250°. Place a rack in a roasting pan.

5. Liberally season the beef with salt and pepper. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over high heat. When the skillet is hot, add ¼ inch of canola oil. When the oil begins to smoke, add the beef, fat side down, and sear until golden brown, 3 to 5 minutes. Repeat on all sides. Remove from the heat.

6. Cover the rack in the roasting pan with the thyme, rosemary and garlic. Place the beef on the herbs and garlic bulb halves, fat side up. Put the pan in the oven and roast the beef for about 2 hours and 45 minutes, until the internal temperature reaches 125°. Remove the pan from the oven and let the beef rest for 25 to 30 minutes before carving it. Baste the beef with the pan juices several times as it rests. Remove the green garlic butter from the freezer 1 hour before serving.

To complete:

7. Carve the rib eye into 6 slices and arrange on warmed plates. Top each slice with a ½-inch-thick disk of room-temperature green garlic butter and serve with the potato confit.

NOTE: This recipe makes more green garlic–parsley butter than you will need for the rib eye, but it can be frozen, tightly wrapped, for up to 1 month and used in other dishes.

For the heirloom potato confit:

Serves 12 to 15

For the brine:

Combine 4 cups of the water, the salt and sugar in a large stainless steel or enameled pot and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve the salt and sugar. Add the remaining 3 quarts water and stir. Add the potatoes, remove the pot from the stove and brine the potatoes at room temperature for at least 6 hours, or overnight.

1. Preheat the oven to 250°. Combine the butter, olive oil, lard and bacon fat in a Dutch oven and heat over medium heat until melted. Stir, add the salt, white pepper, thyme sprigs, garlic cloves and bay leaves, and heat for 7 minutes to infuse the fat with flavor.

2. Meanwhile, remove the potatoes from the brine (discard the brine) and pat dry with a kitchen towel. Carefully place the potatoes in the hot fat, cover the Dutch oven, transfer to the oven and roast the potatoes for 3 hours, until very soft. Cool the potatoes to room temperature. The potatoes can be eaten right away, but they are better if they are refrigerated, covered with the cooking fat, in an airtight container for at least 3 days.

NOTE: Covered in the fat, the potatoes will keep for up to 1 month in the refrigerator. The longer they sit, the better they get. Because of bacteria on your hands, always use a spoon to retrieve the potatoes from the fat; make sure to cover the remaining potatoes with the fat.

For the rendered fresh lard:

Put the pork fat and water in a medium nonreactive pot and place over low heat. Cook for 1½ hours, stirring occasionally. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a lidded container. Discard the browned bits that remain in the sieve. Covered, the lard will keep for up to 3 weeks in the refrigerator. Makes 1½ cups.


Excerpted from Heritage by Sean Brock (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2014. Photographs by Peter Frank Edwards.

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Ingredients

Green Garlic–Parsley Butter
  • 2 cups chopped green garlic (green and white parts)
  • 1 pound unsalted butter, slightly softened
  • 1 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 cup minced shallots
  • Grated zest of ½ lemon (use a Microplane)
  • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons anchovy paste
Rib Eye
  • 1 center-cut bone-in rib eye roast (about 7.5 pounds), deckle and fat cap left on
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Canola oil
  • 15 thyme sprigs
  • 15 rosemary sprigs
  • 1 garlic bulb, cut in half
  • 5 cups Heirloom Potato Confit (recipe follows)
Heirloom Potato Confit
  • 1 gallon water
  • 2 cups kosher salt
  • ¾ cup sugar
  • 5 pounds small heirloom potatoes, washed
  • 1 pound unsalted butter
  • 2 cups extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups Rendered Fresh Lard (recipe follows)
  • 1 cup rendered bacon fat
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
  • 20 thyme sprigs
  • 12 garlic cloves
  • 2 fresh bay leaves
Rendered Fresh Lard
  • 1 quart pork fat, diced into ½-inch pieces
  • ½ cup water
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